Mar 312017
 

CognitiveThere are approximately 22,000 new cases of lung cancer each year with an overall 5-year survival rate of only ~18 percent (American Cancer Society). The economic burden of lung cancer just based on per patient cost is estimated $46,000/patient (lung cancer journal). Treatment efforts using drugs and chemotherapy are effective for some, however more effective treatment has been hampered by the inability of clinicians to better target treatments to patients. It has been determined that Big Data holds the key for providing clinicians with the ability to develop more effective patient centered cancer treatments.

Analysis of Big Data may also improve drug development by allowing researchers to better target novel treatments to patient populations. Providing the ability for clinicians to harness Big Data repositories to develop better targeted lung cancer treatments and to enhance the decision-making process to improve patient care can only be accomplished through the use of cognitive computing. However, having a source or sources of data available to “mine” for answers to improve lung cancer treatments is a challenge!

There is also a lack of available applications that can take advantage of Big Data repositories to recognize patterns of knowledge and extract that knowledge in any meaningful way. The extraction of knowledge must be presented in a way that researchers can use to improve patient centric diagnosis and the development of patient centric treatments. Having the ability to use cognitive computing and KM methods to uncover knowledge from large cancer repositories will provide researchers in hospitals, universities, and pharmaceutical companies with the ability to use Big Data to identify anomalies, discover new treatment combinations and enhance diagnostic decision making.

Content Curation

An important aspect to cognitive computing and Big Data is the ability to perform a measure of content curation. The lung cancer Big Data environment that will be analyzed should include both structured and unstructured data (unstructured being documents, spreadsheets, images, video, etc.). In order to ingest the data from the Big Data resource the data will need to be prepared. This data preparation includes applying Information Architecture (IA) to the unstructured data within the repository. Understanding the organization and classification schemes relating to the data both structured and unstructured is essential to unifying the data into one consistent ontology.

Are We Up for the Challenge!

Even if a Big Data source was available and content curation was successful, the vast amounts of patient data is governed by HIPAA laws which makes it difficult for researchers to gain access to clinical and genomic data shared across multiple institutions or firms including research institutions and hospitals. According to Dr. Tom Coburn in his January 14th article in the Wall Street Journal ‘A Cancer ‘Moonshot’ Needs Big Data; gaining access to a big data repository all inclusive of patient specific data is essential to offering patient centered cancer treatments. Besides the technology challenges, there are data and regulation challenges. I’m sure that many of these challenges are being addressed. Thus, far there have been no solutions. Are we up for the challenge? Big Data analysis could help tell us which cancer patients are most likely to be cured with standard approaches, and which need more aggressive treatment and monitoring. It is time we solve these challenges to make a moonshot a certain reality!

Feb 292016
 

Cancer MoonshotOn January 12, 2016 in his State of the Union address, President Obama called for America to become “the country that cures cancer once and for all” As he introduced the “Moonshot” initiative that will be guided by Vice President Joe Biden.

Dr. Tom Coburn, former Republican Senator from the state of Oklahoma and three time cancer survivor, in his January 14th article in the Wall Street Journal ‘A Cancer ‘Moonshot’ Needs Big Data ; indicates that “harnessing that information (“big data”) would allow us to personalize prevention and treatment based on the genetic characteristics of a patient’s tumor, family history and personal preferences, while minimizing unwanted side effects.”

On February 5, 2016 on CNN’s Global Public Square show: Big data could be a health care game-changer author and doctor, David Agus tells Fareed Zakaria how using big data and examining thousands of cases might increase how long we live and our quality of life.

At this time in our history, with the continuing electronic capture of patient information from intake to discharge, the opportunity could not be brighter to cure cancer. The Obama administration’s 2010 initiative to capture electronic health records has enabled the opportunity to improve patient care, increase patient participation, improve diagnostics and patient outcomes, improve care coordination, as well as create practice efficiencies and cost savings.

The electronic capture of patient information has created medical big data repositories. One such repository is the American College of Surgeons/American Cancer Society’s National Cancer Database – NCDB. Resources such as these will benefit by utilizing knowledge management and information architecture techniques to identify and unlock knowledge patterns contained within these big data sources. In several of my blog post dating back to January 2013, I wrote about the advantages of applying KM to big data. From understanding Contextual Intelligence KM and Big Data ; to devoting a chapter on KM and Big Data in my upcoming book KM in Practice; I believe when executed the right way KM, powered by information architecture will provide the essential ingredient when applied to big data. This will enable researchers to discover better treatments and possible cures for many diseases including cancer and we will realize the dream presented by the Moonshot initiative!