Jun 142011
 

UML for Developing Knowledge Management SystemsWithin knowledge management (KM), the ability to harvest or capture the knowledge of workers has been a challenge for many years (see blog post: Capturing Tacit Knowledge).

The capturing, cataloging, and reuse of explicit knowledge of workers has been accomplished effectively through the use of content management systems. However, capturing, cataloging, and reuse of tacit knowledge remains an elusive, and often controversial subject within KM.

To address the issue of capturing, cataloging, and reuse of tacit knowledge I have developed a methodology which I believe effectively addresses this issue. This methodology is the Knowledge Acquisition Unified Framework (KAUF). The original basis for this framework is detailed in my publication from CRC Press UML for Developing Knowledge Management Systems. This framework has been utilized for the military at the Surface Deployment Distribution Command (SDDC) and also leveraged at a major retail company with some measurable success.

The framework’s flexibility allows for many project management and software tools to drive and implement applications based on the guidance of the framework. The framework consists of seven (7) major steps:

  1. Define domain knowledge
  2. Decompose the domain knowledge
  3. Determine interdependency
  4. Recognize knowledge patterns
  5. Determine judgments in knowledge
  6. Perform conflict resolution
  7. Capture an catalogue the knowledge

These steps provide a repeatable process for identifying, understanding, and cataloguing the tacit knowledge of the organization during the knowledge elicitation process.

In the post to follow over the next couple of weeks I will detail more about the KAUF and welcome your questions and comments. In the meantime I can be reached via twitter at Tony Rhem.

Feb 012011
 

knowledge management at your organizationHave you ever wondered what all the fuss is about concerning knowledge management (KM)? What is knowledge management anyway?

At its core KM is about sharing and collaborating about what you know, capturing what you know, and reusing that knowledge so as to not reinvent the wheel and/or to combine with other ideas to foster innovation.

Recently I had the privilege to attend a KM meeting conducted by the APQC (APQC’s January 2011 KM Community Call), which had representatives from Conoco Phillips, Fluor, IBM, GE, and Schlumberger. What I came away from this meeting with is the need to have KM become part of an organization’s culture. I believe that this is important because we do not want KM to be “another task to complete on the checklist”, but the way we conduct business. This includes the business between the various individuals and entities within our corporations as well as with our customers. Talking, listening, capturing, and applying what we learn from each other is a constant never-ending and always evolving process.

I challenge all of us to take this attitude into our workplace and remember that when you share what you know you don’t lose that knowledge, but rather you enhance that knowledge with the other individuals you share it with. Take a minute to review the slides from the APQC Jan 2011 KM Community Call as well as this video from YouTube Discover What You Know.

Feel free to comment and share your knowledge!

Sep 282010
 
the need for diversityThe power that Knowledge Management (KM) brings to an organization is its ability to leverage the power of diversity. I am not speaking of just diversity of race, gender and/or religion, but diversity of thought.

Through collaboration, knowledge sharing, and knowledge reuse it is important to leverage different points of view, different experiences and different cultural backgrounds to stimulate diversity of thought. This diversity of thought leads to innovation. This innovation will enable organizations to deliver unique and or improved products and services to its customers as well as improve the way the organization does business.

Diversity of thought is encouraged and utilized today in the push by corporations to support Board Diversity in expanding the makeup of their corporate boards, through Affirmative Action programs to promote a diverse workforce and through a myriad of organizations that understand that diversity of thought will improve everything from our educational system, healthcare system, create new jobs, and improve how our politicians work together!

Communities of Practice (CoP) is a tool utilized within KM which provide environments where people can collaborate, catalog, and reuse knowledge centered around a certain topic, practice area, or profession, to name a few. This community will bring “like minded” people together regardless of their race, gender and/or religion to stimulate thought, exchange ideas and learn for each other. All focused on innovation, and improving performance. The need for diversity of thought will continue to be a catalyst for our culture to improve the way we live, work and play. I welcome everyone to share their stories where this diversity is happening, where it should be happening and where it has been successful or not!